China’s “Militarisation” in the South China Sea: Three Target Audiences - CWP Alumni Kuik Cheng Chwee

Tuesday, Apr 25, 2017
by dsuchens

Abstract: If “militarisation” is defined as an act of deploying military assets to pursue wider strategic ends, then all players of the South China Sea disputes have engaged in some forms of militarisation. China’s militarisation reflect three layers of target audiences: the United States (the main target), regional countries (the secondary target) and its domestic audience. Beijing’s growing anxieties over US rebalancing and the arbitration ruling have paradoxically pushed it to accelerate its “militarisation” activities.

Duterte's and Najib's China Visits and the Future of Small-State 'Realignment' in the Trump Era - CWP Alumni Kuik Cheng Chwee

Tuesday, Apr 25, 2017
by dsuchens

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte and Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak madehigh-profile visits to China from October 18-21 and from October 31 to November 5,2016, respectively. It was the first China visit for Duterte since he took office about four months earlier (his first trip outside of ASEAN), and the third for Najib as premier since 2009. Both visits sparked concerns that have grown after Donald Trump's sur-prise triumph on November 8. Is the United States losing to China in the long-term geopolitical competition in Southeast Asia?

China’s Troop Contributions to U.N. Peacekeeping - CWP Alumni Courtney J. Fung

Tuesday, Apr 25, 2017
by dsuchens

China, traditionally reluctant to intervene, has become a major contributor to UN peacekeeping operations. However, given its available assets, the country has the capacity to increase its commitments and play a key role in improving peacekeeping operations. This brief examines China’s rise as a global security provider and what can be done to drive its further engagement in the peacekeeping landscape.

The Challenge of Maintaining American Security Ties in Post-Authoritarian East Asia - CWP Alumni Andrew Erickson & Ja Ian Chong

Monday, Apr 17, 2017
by dsuchens

Washington must address the challenges associated with political transition to better mitigate the various risks associated with the liberal democratization of its East Asian partners.

Andrew S. EricksonJa Ian Chong

January 29, 2015

China and the Free-Rider Problem: Exploring the Case of Energy Security - CWP Alumni Andrew Kennedy

Monday, Apr 17, 2017
by dsuchens

IS CHINA PULLING ITS WEIGHT IN THE INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM? In recent years, China has increased its contribution to United Nations peacekeeping, raised its foreign aid to impoverished countries, and made significant commitments to global arms control initiatives.1 Even so, a rising chorus of voices has charged that China is “free riding” on cooperation undertaken by the United States and other countries that provides benefits to the wider international community.

Can Xi Jinping and Narendra Modi establish an economic partnership? - CWP Alumni Manjari Chatterjee Miller

Monday, Apr 17, 2017
by dsuchens

Manjari Chatterjee Miller is Assistant Professor of International Relations at the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University and the author of Wronged by Empire: Post-Imperial Ideology and Foreign Policy in India and China.

Manjari Chatterjee Miller

Unpacking the Patterns of Corporate Restructuring during China's SOE Reform - By CWP Alumni Fellow Xiaojun Li

Wednesday, Apr 5, 2017
by dsuchens

State owned enterprises (SOEs) in China have undergone significant restructuring since the mid-1990s. To date, scholars have devoted considerable attention to the constraints and motives of corporate restructuring in China. Yet the majority of the existing studies treat restructuring as a simple ownership transfer from the state to non-state entities without differentiating the resulting ownership structure of the firm. Consequently, we know relatively little about why otherwise similar SOEs were restructured at different times and through different means.

Debating China's Assertiveness - A Discussion with CWP Alumnis Xiaoyu Pu, DingDing Chen & Alastair Iain Johnston

Wednesday, Apr 5, 2017
by dsuchens

In “How New and Assertive Is China’s New Assertiveness?” Iain Johnston argues that China’s recent foreign policy is not as assertive as many scholars and pundits contend. Johnston’s study is a welcome addition to the literature on Chinese foreign policy in three respects.1 First, it is the most comprehensive study by a leading China scholar on China’s new assertiveness. Second, it challenges the conventional understanding that this assertiveness is both unprecedented and aggressive by design. Third, it addresses potential problems of overestimating the threat from China.

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